Vanity Or Useful? Virante Authorrank

I adopted author rank and publisher rank as soon as I figured out how to set it up.

My reasoning was that if I want results to appear well in Google, and Google was promoting author rank, then it made sense to take advantage of it.

Yesterday, after reading an article on Social Media Today about author rank, I clicked through to the tool at Author Rank and ran a few names, including my own, through it.

I ran names that I thought would have a strong profile.

Here are a couple of FAQs from the Author Rank FAQs :

Is Virante AuthorRank the same as Google AuthorRank?
No, Virante AuthorRank is not the same as Google AuthorRank.
First, “AuthorRank” is not a Google term. Google has never officially used it. The term was invented by members of the SEO and web tech community as a convenient shorthand to describe Google’s stated intention to eventually evaluate authors by perceived authority in various subject areas, and to use that to boost in search results the content of high-authority authors. This was first described in a series of Google patents known as the “Agent Rank” patents. 
Virante AuthorRank does not use the same data or signals as described in Google’s Agent Rank patents. Agent Rank was to be largely based on social signals, indications from other people that they value an author’s content. Virante AgentRank is based almost entirely on link-based signals, those things that are the primary signals to a search engine of authority for a piece of web content.
What does Virante AuthorRank measure?
Virante’s AuthorRank tool gives a series of scores that measure the general search ranking “power” of an author’s published web content. Factors that are used in assessing this score include:
Use of Google Authorship
Diversity of sites to which an author contributes
Link value of sites to which an author contributes
Volume of content produced by author
Link value of content produced by author

Here are the results:







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