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Things About Bees

The author of the article in the Telegraph is Dr Reese Halter - a conservation biologist at California Lutheran University and author of 'The Incomparable Honey Bee and the Economics of Pollination'

At the end of her article she states "...it is tragic that hundreds of billions of honey bees are dying worldwide due to CCD, which many scientists blame on a group of pesticides called neonictinoids..."
Importantly, she has no problem from her expert position in suggesting that neonicotinoids are the cause of CCD (colony collapse disorder).
 You may recall the NY Times article in July
  http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/07/science/07bees.html?_r=3&src=ISMR_HP_LO_MST_FB

that reported on the work of the team that came to the conclusion that the cause of CCD was the combined effect of the varroa mite and a virus.

Everything looked promising until it was revealed that the lead investigator of the team was paid by BAYER Crop Science - a leading manufacturer of neonicotonids. I amplified that here:


Amplify’d from www.telegraph.co.uk
honey production is booming in the UK
bees can count to five
whereas sniffer dogs are accurate about 71 per cent of the time, and require at least three months' training, honey bees are accurate 98 per cent of the time, and require less than 10 minutes' training.
The Red Cross estimates that between 80 million and 120 million landmines exist in 70 countries, maiming 22,000 people (mostly children) each year. A system devised by the University of Montana counters this by fitting honey bees with miniature microchips. As the bees fly around, the electrostatic charge from their bodies attracts TNT residue, the explosive component from landmines. Once they return to the hive, this can be detected, and a scan of the chip will reveal the appropriate location.
Honey bees are already being used as early detectors of lung and skin cancers, diabetes and TB, as well as to monitor fertility cycles and confirm pregnancies. Patients breathe into a glass diagnostic tool; when the trained bees detect any of the diseases or hormones, they move towards the tubes that lead closer to the breath. 

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