Ryan Block Asks About The Mac App Store

I am interested in what others on Amplify think of Ryan Block's opinion here.
Further into the article (it's quite a long article) Ryan says:
"The universe of desktop apps that the average person will pay for has shrunk. For me, the consumer desktop software that tends to get me to pull out my wallet is stuff I can try out first, and it tends to be a little more esoteric. It’s the kind of software that gets down and dirty in fixing, changing, or extending stuff in ways Apple doesn't, like Growl, Perian, Smartsleep, Stay, TimeMachineEditor, MagicPrefs, Default Apps, and Cinch. Naturally, these are the areas where Apple's stringent rules and need for control come into play. Here are some examples of App Store rules that would apparently exclude some of my favorite (paid) apps on the Mac App Store:
2.6 - Apps that are "beta", "demo", "trial", or "test" versions will be rejected
2.18 - Apps that install kexts will be rejected
2.26 - Apps that are set to auto-launch or to have other code automatically run at startup or login without user consent will be rejected
6.5 - Apps that change the native user interface elements or behaviors of Mac OS X will be rejected"
From gdgt.com
Will the Mac App Store have enough to sell?
Apple bringing the App Store to the Mac was a pretty obvious move -- I know I’m not the only one who was predicting it would happen sooner or later, and I’m sure I’m not the only one who thinks this is going to have a huge impact for some Mac software developers. But what happens when Apple’s growing need for control over its ecosystem meets the inexorable trend of software migrating to the cloud? Will there even be much left to sell in an App Store in a few years?
The real issue with the desktop software market is that (unless you're talking about productivity software) there just isn't all that much consumers need to buy anymore. The boxed software business didn't die because of app stores, it died because of an overabundance of great programs that are free, open, or otherwise subsidized that are available through other web or internet services. To put it another way: lately, how often have your parents bought software for their computer (that wasn't Microsoft Office)? Read more at gdgt.com

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